New Publication: DiceCT and Histology for Peripheral Nerve Repair

H&E stained section (top left) matched to the corresponding axial μCT image (bottom left) and a section stained with anti-NF (to right) matched to the axial μCT image (bottom). Asterisks label nerve conduits. The long arrow in points to a group of anti-NF stained axons and short arrows point to a small pocket of fat (left) and a large blood vessel (right). Scale bars = 0.5 mm
H&E stained section (top left) matched to the corresponding axial μCT image (bottom left) and a section stained with anti-NF (top right) matched to the axial μCT image (bottom right). Asterisks label nerve conduits. The long arrow points to a group of anti-NF stained axons, and short arrows point to a small pocket of fat (left) and a large blood vessel (right). Scale bars = 0.5 mm.

In pre-clinical studies, biomaterial implants with densities similar to tissues cannot be imaged via standard μCT after removal from the animal. These ex vivo implants then present investigative challenges with histological analyses because of implant size, and critical information can be lost. We used iodine-based contrast-enhanced μCT imaging to visualize polymeric biomaterial nerve guides used to repair injury gaps in rodent peripheral nerves, followed by rapid removal of the iodine, and showed that these treatments did not interfere with histological or immunohistological analyses. This increases the information that can be obtained from one set of animals, allows novel comparisons and thus could help researchers studying any soft tissue or tissue-density biomaterial implant.

–Author Sarah Pixley  @

Head over to the Journal of Neuroscience Methods to read the pub!

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